The Importance Of Dental X-Rays During An Examination

The Importance Of Dental X-Rays During An Examination

Dental X-rays are needed for keeping a track of your oral health. But many patients are sceptical about why it’s needed. Let’s answer some of their questions:

Do you really need dental X-rays?

The radiographic examination of the mouth helps in diagnosis as well as management of various dental conditions. It helps in detecting oral issue that may not be seen by visual examination alone and before the symptoms appear.

Why X-rays?

X-rays are also known as Radiographs. They capture the parts of your mouth which the dentist can’t see. The hard tissues such as bones and teeth absorb more radiations than soften gums and create a picture which clearly shows the difference between these tissues.

Who should have them?

While in adults frequent X-ray may not be needed and a fresh X-ray may only be demanded if you are seeing a new practitioner, in kids, the jaws are still growing so they need more frequent X-rays, especially if they have a history of cavities.

Are There Different Types of X-Rays?

  • The bitewing X-ray is used for detecting or confirming decay in teeth and presence of gum disease between the teeth.
  • The Periapical film shows the entire tooth, tooth roots, and surrounding bone for examining root tips of teeth and diagnose bone loss due to gum disease.
  • The Orthopantomogram is a panoramic view of the lower face which displays all teeth of the upper and lower jaw in a single film.
  • The Lat Ceph is side view of X-ray of the face showing bones and facial contours in profile on a single film.

How Often Should You Have Dental X-Rays?

It will depend on the recommendation of the dentist in Jackson 39216 based on your dental condition.

Are They Safe?

Though you may feel that radiations are not good for you, not getting X-rays can be even more risky. If you are pregnant, inform the dentist before x-ray.

X Rays are very significant for precise prognosis of an issue and help the dentist in 39216 to get the root cause of the oral issue.